The_Aeneid

The_Aeneid - Hospitality and Fairness between Enemies...

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Hospitality and Fairness between Enemies during War While the end of The Aeneid shows an increase in fighting between the Trojans and the Latins, it also demonstrates their hospitality and graciousness towards each other in following rules of war and being reasonable to the other side’s requests. Acting in this manner seems common for the ancient world, yet unnaturally courteous in modern times. In book eleven, both sides agree on a twelve-day peace to bury their fallen men. They both know that the other side will not be ready for an attack or to defend them during the period of rest, yet neither makes a move to gain the upper hand and take the enemy by surprise. Instead, they respect the agreement made between them and honor the cease-fire for twelve days. When the Latins ask for the bodies of their dead back and a chance to bury them at the beginning of the truce, the Trojans agree, rather than citing a weakness in their enemy and acting upon it. “…and so they made a twelve-day truce, while peace should hold between them…mingling without
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2008 for the course HP 001 taught by Professor Behnegar during the Fall '07 term at BC.

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The_Aeneid - Hospitality and Fairness between Enemies...

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