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TwoPageNotesPaper - 1 According to Socrates, there are...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 According to Socrates, there are three possible levels of knowing things. The first is that of the creator, the gods, or nature, seen as the force behind making the thing that is , or the standard, fundamental idea. This fundamental idea is the ultimate truth. The next level is the craftsman, who is once removed from the truth, but, Socrates claims, is still able to make true objects, based on and resembling the standard, even though these objects are not the exact original truth. However, it is curious that Socrates allows these things to be considered true in any manner when he does not allow imitations, such as paintings, to be considered true, for are these constructions of the standard not imitations as well? With this idea, it appears that Socrates is creating a double standard concerning what qualifies as an imitation, the third level. In fact, Socrates equates at one point the craftsman with the imitator (referred to as a painter in his example), in 597 d , And what about the carpenter?...
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2008 for the course HP 003 taught by Professor Behnegar during the Spring '08 term at BC.

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TwoPageNotesPaper - 1 According to Socrates, there are...

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