Cl36Sp08L15ArVirtAb

Cl36Sp08L15ArVirtAb - CLASSICS 36 LECTURE F IFTEEN THE ART...

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C LASSICS 36: L ECTURE F IFTEEN THE ART OF VIRTUE : A RISTOTLE , N ICOMACHEAN E THICS 1.1-10, 13; 2.1-6 1. The Nicomachean Ethics vs. Ar.'s other works • more polished style • imprecision of topic precludes demonstrative argument (1.3) • conforming account with reputable opinions and common beliefs esp. important (though n.b. Ar. does this to some extent in all his inquiries) (1095a28-30; i.8) • written to improve a willing audience, not convince a sceptical one (1103b28-30, 1095b1-5, 1095a1-5) 2. Fundamental characteristics of Aristotle’s ethical theory • human beings have a specific nature, one that gives them certain goals in life (see §3, “function argument”); what a person takes to be good for him is not necessarily what is really good for him • our good is a complete human life lived at its best; exercise of virtues is constitutive part of such a life, not just a means towards achieving it (see §4) • to live the good life requires the exercise of good judgment in particular
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This note was uploaded on 06/08/2008 for the course CLASSIC 36 taught by Professor Ferrari during the Spring '08 term at Berkeley.

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Cl36Sp08L15ArVirtAb - CLASSICS 36 LECTURE F IFTEEN THE ART...

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