EVS3 final - Andrew Lucas Environmental Studies 3 TA...

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Andrew Lucas 5/29/08 Environmental Studies 3 TA: Heather Abbey Section: Wednesday 8 a.m. The New Beginning The year is 2040. Mankind has just endured the most devastating famine it has ever seen. The human race was on the brink of total annihilation. But, somehow, we pushed through. With over one quarter of Earth’s population decimated, it will be hard to pick up the pieces. Fortunately we were able to find a copy of Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Environmental Issues , by Thomas Easton, the book that saved the human race. The book is a compilation of published articles from various researchers that address sides of certain environmental issues. You see, about thirty years ago, the planet was frantically trying to figure out ways in which to sustain the rapidly growing human population. A group of scientists came up with a revolutionary way to grow crops. They said that their crops could grow twice as fast and had the same, if not more, nutritional value that that of the food we were already growing. They called it SuperFood. Things were going great for a while, world hunger was way down, infant deaths were way down, and these crops were generating a lot of capital for third world countries. These crops were working so well, that certain countries began to utilize most of their farmland to grow them, leaving behind conventional agricultural methods. Then the unthinkable happened. A deadly plant disease left almost 80% of the crops devastated. The disease was created from a mutation of a gene that created certain chemicals inside the plant in order to fend off unwanted pests. Famine and disease ran rampant throughout world. Millions were dying daily. People thought that it was the end of the world. There were
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so many issues that had to be dealt with: the huge decline in the human population, GMO foods, and organic farming, before things would be tranquil again. Fortunately, we were able to act fast enough to counter the problem, and the human race was saved. The world switched its farming trends from these genetically modified crops to a more natural and organic way of farming, which was now possible due to the drop in population. When dealing with these issues, all we could really do was turn to Taking Sides. One of the first issues that had to be dealt with was the huge decrease in the human population. Before the famine, the world had almost 9 billion people on it, now there are about 6.8 billion. The world was already due for a pretty significant drop in population in 2050 due to the already low fertility rates (Easton 2006, p.246); the famine just prematurely brought it about. In the book Taking Sides
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