OaW p1

OaW p1 - As most of us know, the world is in a serious...

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As most of us know, the world is in a serious energy crisis. Historically, the low prices of fossil fuels have deterred the development of alternative energy sources. Recently, however, the prices of fossil fuels have seen a steady increase in price. Since 2000, the price per barrel of crude oil has risen from about $25 per barrel to about $95. Just a year ago, the price for a barrel of crude oil was about $65. That is a $30 increase in just one year. It seems economically impossible to satisfy the oil appetite of the U.S., importing over 13 million barrels per day, which come out to about 1.2 billion dollars a day! Here is a chart of the U.S.’s energy use by source: Petroleum accounts for 42% of the U.S.’s total energy use. Just think of the economic benefits of lowering that dependency just a little bit. I propose that the U.S. moves more towards cleaner, renewable energy sources, like wind and solar energy. These are also the cheapest sources of energy. Also, the United States should be utilizing its coal reserves more efficiently. The U.S. consumes more energy per capita than any other country in the world, more than four times the amount. Energy consumption per capita in the United States has risen by more than 5% since 1990. The United States imports about six times more energy than it exports. This is obviously not economically sound for the country. By 2015, the United States will be consuming more than 117 quadrillion Btu per year, and by 2025, that number will have risen to over 132 quadrillion Btu a year. 40% of this energy consumption will be in the form of petroleum, while only 6% will be in the form of renewable energy. Transportation accounts for 42% of the United States energy consumption, more than any other sector. That is about as much energy as the U.S. industry and agriculture consume combined. In 2015, transportation will consume more than 49 quadrillion Btu, that is more than most countries consume
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OaW p1 - As most of us know, the world is in a serious...

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