33-1 Notes - Allie Daniliuk B2 33-1 Cold War Superpowers Face Off Terms to know United Nations Iron curtain Containment Truman Doctrine Marshall Plan

33-1 Notes - Allie Daniliuk B2 33-1 Cold War Superpowers...

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Allie Daniliuk B2 33-1: Cold War: Superpowers Face Off Terms to know: United Nations Iron curtain Containment Truman Doctrine Marshall Plan Cold War NATO Warsaw Pact Brinkmanship Allies Become Enemies The United States was upset that Joseph Stalin, the Soviet leader, had signed a nonaggression pact with Germany in 1939 and Stalin blamed the Allies for not invading German-occupied Europe earlier than 1944 Driven by these and other disagreements, the two allies began to pursue opposing goals Yalta Conference: A Postwar Plan The leaders of the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union met at the Soviet Black Sea resort of Yalta They agreed to divide Germany into zones of occupation controlled by the Allied military forces Germany also would have to pay the Soviet Union to compensate for its loss of life and property Stalin agreed to join the war against Japan He also promised that Eastern Europeans would have free elections Winston Churchill predicted that Stalin would keep his pledge only if the Eastern Europeans followed “a policy friendly to Russia” Creation of the United Nations United States and the Soviet Union temporarily set aside their differences and joined 48 other countries in forming the United Nations (UN) This international organization was intended to protect the members against aggression It was to be based in New York The charter for the new peacekeeping organization established a large body called the General Assembly There, each UN member nation could cast its vote on a broad range of issues
Allie Daniliuk B2 An 11-member body called the Security Council had the real power to investigate and settle disputes, though its five permanent members were Britain, China, France, the United States, and the Soviet Union Each could veto any Security Council action Differing U.S. and Soviet Goals Despite agreement at Yalta and their presence on the Security Council, the United States and the Soviet Union split sharply after the war The war had affected them very differently The United States, the world’s richest and most powerful country, suffered 400,000 deaths but its cities and factories remained intact The Soviet Union had at least 50 times as many fatalities One in four Soviets was wounded or killed These contrasting situations, as well as political and economic differences, affected the two countries’ postwar goals

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