Radical Republicans and the Compromise of 1877 - Radical Republicans and the Compromise of 1877 By Ethan Lott Teacher Ms Welborn Date The Compromise of

Radical Republicans and the Compromise of 1877 - Radical...

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Radical Republicans and the Compromise of 1877 By: Ethan Lott Teacher: Ms. Welborn Date: 12/17/16 The Compromise of 1877 was a result of one of the most disputed and controversial U.S elections in history, where presidential nominees Rutherford B. Hayes, a Republican, and Samuel J. Tilden, a Democrat, faced off. The results of the election within the electoral college were exceptionally tiny, leaving Hayes with just one electoral vote over Tilden, after 20 uncounted votes that were considered disputed, were awarded to Hayes. Because of the overturning of these votes, which were from the states of South Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana where it was originally suspected Tilden had won, the Democrats were sent into an outrage, eventually leading with both parties creating their own governors and legislators with two of the disputed states. To combat this situtation, the representatives of Congress decided to take the election into a commission at the House, where the members could decide who would become president. The Republican commission won by a mere one vote, however Congress had to formulate a way to make sure the results satisifed both parties, so Congress negotitated that federal troops would exfiltrate the areas of the South in exchange for Hayes' presidency. The result within Southern territories soon came to be known as the Jim Crow era, where the idiology of the Black Codes was replaced with a more discreet Jim Crow laws, that worked to find loopholes to allow segregation to continue within the states, despite Congress' continued attempts at stop it. This led to a some questionable statements from slaves and Radical Republicans, some of whom believed Democrats regaining control of the South would be a "fate worse than slavery." While the weight behind this uttered phrase is understandable, it should be noted that the phrase in itself would do better if it were modified. While it may be a mouthful, the statement would be more accurate if it were changed into something such as this: "The situations regarding The Compromise of 1877 while still holding some destructive things slavery might omit, was not as terrible to that of slavery in itself, and perhaps even beneficial in coordinating the freedom the black community rightfully desired." Of course Jim Crow was not a perfect set of laws, as it legally granted the ability to socially seperate the colored and white communites, as well as give a resurgance to the Ku Klux Klan. However, albeit heavily segregated, the Jim Crow laws seemed to outshine the more direct and
persumably "worse" Black Codes with it's more social impact, and still granted blacks freedoms that would never be tolerated under slavery. And finally, the combination of a growing white supremacy, at least among certain groups, combined with the limited freedom black people had, would mix to achieve a result that would ultimately abolish said laws and make black people entirely free, something no one under slavery would ever be able to accomplish.

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