MINORITES AND THEIR AFFECT ON 19TH CENTURY CULTURE - Minorities and Their Affect on 19th Century Culture By Ethan Lott Teacher Ms Welborn Date In the

MINORITES AND THEIR AFFECT ON 19TH CENTURY CULTURE -...

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Minorities and Their Affect on 19th Century Culture By: Ethan Lott Teacher: Ms. Welborn Date: 10/12/16 In the beginning of the 19th century, around 14 years after the American Revolution had ended, America had begun its new descent into the life of a free nation. However, certain cultures within this nation had felt that their positions did not make them feel as "free" as they wanted. This was not an instant change, though, as it took many years of governmental trial and error before cultures could begin to assess changes within certain groups of American inhabitants. The cultures in question, being the Women, Natives, and African American populations. These groups of people had begun to feel as if they weren't living in the "free" America that was promised them. Females were still not allowed to vote or have any working jobs, many blacks were still in slavery, and Native American prescence was beginning its decline as a majority of tribes were being sent away from American soil and onto unfavored "reservations" miles from their familiar homeland. Thus, these cultures (referred to today as "minorites," disregarding a few immigrant populations like Hispanics and Asians which had not immigrated until later into the 20th Century) wanted to seek change that would advocate their chances at a better life within the nation. However, not all had successful outcomes. During the 19th century, varying minorites faced varying outcomes to their impact on American culture. Women faced considerable outcomes, working jobs in the industrial revolution to strengthen their roles outside of the household, Native Americans faced negative outcomes as numerous tribes faced failed revolts that would lead to them being escorted
off their land, and the Blacks faced a bittersweet affect, having retained their role as slaves throughout the South, but also helping the Southern economy prosper, and thus helping its identity remain rural. First way minorites affected American culture, was through the women's successful advocacy to work during the Industrial Revolution. Before the thoughts of mass production came into picture, many workers in the American nation mostly worked rural and merchant jobs, usually ranging from the tobacco cash-cropping industry in the South, to the lumber, ship, and craftsmanship stores of the North. During this time, most women worked indoors, and were involved with keeping up with the house and the children while the man worked outside the home. Around this time, however, women

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