chapter 3.powerpoint.fall.2016

chapter 3.powerpoint.fall.2016 - Empire the Power and the...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Empire : the Power and the Glory The Colosseum , Rome, 72-80 CE, Emperor Vespasian
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius, 121-180 CE, Bronze, Capitolini Museum Empire – from the Latin imperium, the absolute authority held by the rulers of ancient Rome. Rome created the West’s largest and longest-lasting empire. Rome was known for adopting and adapting the best features of the cultures it conquered. This bronze statue of Marcus Aurelius, (emperor) , i s a good visual metaphor for the power that was wielded by the leader of ancient Rome.
Image of page 2
Sarcophagus, from Cerveteri, Italy Terra cotta, 6' 7" length, ca. 520 BCE As early as the 8 th century BCE the Greeks had colonized the southern coastal regions of the Italian peninsula. The Etruscans occupied the part of the Italian peninsula that today is known as Tuscany. Scholars continue to debate whether the Etruscans were indigenous to Italy or whether they migrated from the Near East. Most of what we know of the Etruscans comes from their art --no literature survives --scholars unable to translate their epigrammatic texts They left richly decorated burial tombs (tumulus), bronze work, bucchero pottery, and sculpture which demonstrates their advanced skill in the art. Their tombs suggest a belief in the after life similar to that of the Egyptians.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is a later Roman sarcophagus. It is clear the influence that the Etruscans had on its construction. Note that there is no definition of the faces of the male and female on the lid of the sarcophagus. We can assume that this one was never used because the faces would have been finished as portraits of those who were interred in the sarcophagus if it had been used. This example is located in the Capitolini Museum in Rome.
Image of page 4
She-Wolf Etruscan, Bronze, 33", ca. 500-480 BCE Etruscan founding myth —twins Romulus and Remus found on the banks of the Tiber by a she- wolf who then raised them. The two brothers decided to build a city on the Palatine Hill and argued over who would name the city. Romulus won by killing Remus, and the city was named after him. The date, legend has it, was 753 BCE.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the She-Wolf as it is displayed at the Capitolini Museum in Rome. This gives you a better sense of its size. Adoptions and Adaptations that Rome embraced from its early ancestors : Etruscans : arts of metallurgy, town building, city planning, chariot racing, the toga, bronze and gold crafting, and the arch. Greeks : philosophy and the arts, the gods and goddesses of their religion, linguistic and literary principles, the aesthetics of the Classical Style. Phoenicians : alphabet and commercial and maritime skills
Image of page 6
Republican Rome In 510 BCE the Romans expelled the last of the Etruscan kings and decided to rule themselves without a monarch.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern