Chapter 15 Powerpoint - Globalism Information Communication...

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Globalism: Information, Communication, and the Digital Revolution Globalism – the condition of interdependence between all parts of the world Major Developments of the last half century: Anticolonial and cold war conflicts Existentialism Feminism The quest for racial, ethnic and gender identity Massive information explosion facilitated by digital technology Driving Forces of the 21 st century: Quest for personal freedom A passion for experimentation A fascination with the infinite potential of digital technology The health of the environment The dangers of international terrorism
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The Cold War was essentially a contest for world domination that followed WWII. Communism and capitalist democracy confronted each other in hostile distrust. It resulted in the “hot” conflicts of both Korea (1950-1953) and Vietnam (1964-1973), which resulted in heavy losses for both sides and the lives of many civilians. It did not end until the collapse of Soviet communism in Russia and the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989) Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial , Maye Ying Lin, Washington, D.C., 1981-1983.
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Existentialism The Holocaust and the devastation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki dramatically increased the profound pessimism that had gripped Europeans ever since the turn of the century. How could human beings exist with the knowledge of what human beings could do? French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre argued for what he termed existentialism. Humans must define their own essence (who they are) through their existential being (what they do) For Sartre, there is no meaning to existence, no eternal truth to discover. The only certainty is death
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Theater of the Absurd Sartre’s play No Exit was the first example of what in the 1960s became known as the Theater of the Absurd Among its chief proponents were Samuel Beckett, Eugène Ionesco, Jean Genet, Harold Pinter, Edward Albee, and Tom Stoppard All of these playwrights share a common existential sense of the absurd plus, ironically, a sense that language is a barrier to communication, that speech is almost futile, and that we are condemned to isolation and alienation
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Action Painting Due to a style that came to be known as abstraction expressionism , after the war New York, not Paris, became the center of the art world American artist Jackson Pollack developed “action paintings,” in which the canvas became “an arena in which to act” Pollack would drip, pour, and splash paint over the surface of the canvas, determining the top and bottom of the piece only after the process was complete The result was a galactic sense of space
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Autumn Rhythm , Jackson Pollack, 1950, oil on canvas.
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Color-Field Painting Large paintings of enveloping color characterize another approach to abstract expressionism, a more meditative and quiet painting The scale of these paintings is intentionally large Untitled by Mark Rothko, 1960, oil on canvas exemplifies this idea.
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The Quest for Equality: The Civil Rights Movement In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racially segregated
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  • Fall '16
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., New media art, information explosion

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