WA #1, Version 3

WA #1, Version 3 - Hajjar Page 1 of 6 Jenine Hajjar Section...

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Hajjar Page  1  of  7 Jenine Hajjar Section 67 November 6, 2007 Version #4 Learning to Read Again Simply reading to read and get it over with is not enough.  This was made quite  clear in the “Introduction” of  Ways of Reading.   The beginning of this book was rather  intimidating.  It talked about how difficult the essays in it are and how hard the transition  to new ways of reading and writing is going to be.  Although the beginning was quite  nerve-racking, there were many parts to the section which I found increasingly  interesting and insightful.  At the start of the “Introduction”, I immediately noticed one particular passage  which I found to be so similar to the way I think.  This passage, although only on page  two, really related to my ways of reading.   When you read, you hear an author’s voice as you move along; you  believe   a   person   with   something   to   say   is   talking   to   you.     You   pay  attention, even when you don’t completely understand what is being said,  trusting that it will all makes sense in the end, relating what the author 
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Hajjar Page  2  of  7 says to what you already know or expect to hear or learn.   Even if you  don’t quite grasp everything you are reading at every moment (and you  won’t), and even if you don’t remember everything you’ve read (no reader  does – at least not in long, complex pieces), you begin to see the outlines  of the author’s project, the patterns and rhythms of that particular way of  seeing and interpreting the world. (Bartholomae 2) Another passage which I found particularly interesting, is about halfway through the  reading.  Interesting as it is, however, it is a bit unsettling.  We chose them [the essays], in other words, knowing that we would be  asking you to read something you were most likely not prepared to read. 
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This note was uploaded on 06/09/2008 for the course EN 101 taught by Professor Nelson during the Fall '07 term at Quinnipiac.

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WA #1, Version 3 - Hajjar Page 1 of 6 Jenine Hajjar Section...

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