CS 310 Unit 6 Linear Time Sorting

CS 310 Unit 6 Linear Time Sorting - CS 310 Unit 6 Linear...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CS 310 Unit 6 Linear Time Sorting Furman Haddix Ph.D. Assistant Professor Minnesota State University,  Mankato
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CS 310 Unit 6 Linear Time Sorting  Objectives Limits for Comparison Sorts Counting Sort Stable Sorts Radix Sort Bucket Sort Text, Chapter 8
Background image of page 2
How fast can we sort? All the sorting algorithms we have seen so far  are comparison sorts bubble sort, insertion sort, merge sort , heapsort,  quicksort They are comparison sorts because they only use  comparisons to determine the relative order of  elements. The best worst-case running time that we’ve  seen for comparison sorting is O(n lg n). Is O(n lg n) the best possible sorting time? Is O(n lg n) the best possible sorting time for  comparison sorts? Decision trees can help us answer this last 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An Old Problem The king of Permutastan had 12 counts who reported to  him. Each had to give a measure of gold. He received  information that one was cheating him but didn’t find out  which one.  To add to the problem, it turns out that the cheater might  just give him less gold in which case the measure would  be light, or might put lead in, in which case the measure  would be heavy.  Furthermore, there was only one ancient balance scale  in the whole country.  Making things even worse, it consumed a farthing each  time it was used and there were only three farthings left. Fortunately there were valid measures of gold in the  king’s counting house. Can you help the king determine which of the 12 bags of  gold is not a valid measure?
Background image of page 4
More on the Permutastan  Problem There are two types of strategy: Adaptive, where step 2 is based on the outcome of  step 1, and step 3 is based on results 1 and 2 Non-adaptive where you take the same three steps  and then interpert the results How many possible outcomes are there? Each weighing can be balanced (B), overbalanced to  the left (L) or overbalanced to the right (R). There are only 3 weighings, so the permutations of  the possible outcomes are 3 3  = 27. This problem should have a solution since we are  only trying to distinguish 1 of 24 cases. (1 of 12 is  high or 1 of 12 is low).
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Reasoning about the Permutastan Problem Design of first test. We have 24 possibilities, so ideally, for  each result of our first test we will have only eight  possibilities For our first test, we’ll put 1, 2, 3, 4 on the left balance Then we’ll put 5, 6, 7, 8 on the right.
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 38

CS 310 Unit 6 Linear Time Sorting - CS 310 Unit 6 Linear...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online