monstrosity - Garcia 1 Raquel Garcia Prof Johnson Writing 1 2 December 2016 How Different Texts Discuss the Theme of Monstrosity In Mary Shelleys

monstrosity - Garcia 1 Raquel Garcia Prof Johnson Writing 1...

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Garcia 1 Raquel Garcia Prof. Johnson Writing 1 2 December 2016 How Different Texts Discuss the Theme of Monstrosity In Mary Shelley’s fictional novel Frankenstein , the author brings up the thematic idea of monstrosity, employing the characterization of the protagonist Victor and conflict between the creature and humankind to indicate that Victor Frankenstein is the true monster of the story, not the creature. In Kazuo Ishiguro’s dystopian novel Never Let Me Go, the human clones disgust the people in this fictional society, depicting them in a monstrous way; however, it is shown throughout the novel that the clones are human, because of their creation of art, relationships with friends, and complex emotions. In T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of Alfred Prufrock,” the protagonist is seen as a monster because of his inability to truly live life as a human. In each of these texts, the idea of monstrosity is brought up in regards to how society makes these individuals feel about their own humanity. In both of the novels, those deemed monsters by their society are actually human, but Alfred Prufrock in T.S Eliot’s poem is a monster in the way that he accepts society’s judgments unto himself, preventing him from having any social interaction. In both novels Never Let Me Go and Frankenstein, the students and the creature are treated as monsters by society. In Frankenstein , the creature explains his turn from good to evil, saying, “I cherished hope, it is true; but it vanished when I beheld my person reflected in the water, or my shadow in the moonshine” (Shelley 127). The creature considered himself to be good, comparing himself to Adam from Lost Paradise , until he was treated poorly by every human he came into contact with. This treatment caused him to change his attitude towards life,
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Garcia 2 making him turn to evil. Just like society’s perception of him changed the creature’s view of himself, the students are influenced by society. The students in Never Let Me Go are not monsters, as society labels them, because they have the ability to form complex relationships and express individual emotions. Towards the end of the novel, Madame explains the purpose of Hailsham to the students, saying “if students are brought up in humane, cultivating
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