Exam 3 Study Guide 3341 - Sp2014 PSY\/MH 3341.01 Lifespan Development Exam 3 Study Guide Memory Ch 8 Define memory-the ability to store and later

Exam 3 Study Guide 3341 - Sp2014 PSY/MH 3341.01 Lifespan...

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Sp2014 PSY/MH 3341.01 Lifespan Development Exam 3 Study Guide. Memory Ch. 8 Define memory -the ability to store and later retrieve information about past events The persistence of learning over time What are the 4 steps in 'information processing’ (p.245)? -Encoding : getting information into our brain -Consolidation : organizing & preparing for storage – effortful -Storage : retain information over time -Retrieval : getting information back out What does ‘dual-store’ memory mean? Short term and long term memory are different Sensory register (lost) attention short term or working memory (lost) effort  long term memory Who first proposed it? William James in 1890 Be able to draw the Atkinson-Shiffin model of dual store memory. What was Baddeley’s update of the model? Know the types of memory & specifics of each: sensory register (know iconic and echoic) Sensory Register – will log info, holding it for a fraction of a second as an afterimage, much that strikes the sensory register quickly disappears o Afterimage or echo o Info. picked up by sensory receptors o Iconic or echoic Sensory register : ‘Afterimage or echo’ Environmental info picked up and transformed by sensory receptors Iconic Visual Echoic Auditory Short term/working Short-Term Memory – where information moves that you think you will need to remember, can hold a limited amount of information for several seconds o Information in short term memory can come from sensory register or pulled from long term memory o 7 items o aka working memory Working Memory – a mental ‘scratch pad’ that temporarily stores information while actively operating on it changes information into another form (example) think of the numbers 5, 4, 3, 2, 1; now figure the sum Long term Long-Term Memory – a relatively permanent store of information, moves there after rehearsal o Unlimited capacity –holds information for hours, days or years –relatively permanent –‘unlimited’ capacity Conscious (declarative, explicit, semantic, episodic) Explicit – declarative available to our awareness Sensory Register Attention Short term or Working Memory
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Hippocampus Semantic -meaning, facts without reference to time or place of learning Episodic -personal, specific experience at a particular time, in a particular space Un-effortful, automatic processing : - space, -time, -frequency Unconscious, procedural, implicit memory & brain structures for each (PFC, hippocampus, cerebellum) Implicit cannot consciously access the memory; see it in behavior Cerebellum Procedural –Motor –‘Muscle memory’ –Skills Balance & Equilibrium What are 3 reasons memory can fail (p. 376-380)? Failure to remember: Encoding - acquisition failure Storage failure - decay Retrieval- access failure Alyssa’s Answers: Encoding/acquisition failure o Unable to hold relevant pieces in short term memory Consolidation failure o Was informed, processed, and organized appropriately but lack strategies for transferring into a long term Storage failure o Did it get to long term – decay o The persistence of learning over time Retrieval failure o
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