Experiment 1

Experiment 1 - Griselmarie Alemar Partner Amber Frommherz...

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Griselmarie Alemar Partner: Amber Frommherz Chem 1 Summer Session May 26, 2008 Lab TA: Timothy Wilson-Byrne TITLE: The Separation of a Mixture PURPOSE: This lab was an exercise in teaching students how to create experimental procedure. The purpose of this lab was to use the physical and chemical properties of the substances making up a solid mixture which consisted of silicon dioxide (SiO 2, sand), ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl), and sodium chloride (NaCl, salt). To separate the mixture we employ sublimation, dissolution, decantation, and evaporation. Being that there are specific physical and chemical properties for these substances, e.i. NH 4 Cl sublimes, NaCl and NH 4 Cl dissolve in water while SiO 2 shares none of these properties, we used these properties to separate the mixture, measured the mass of each substance, and determined the the percent (by mass) composition of the mixture. PROCEDURE: The procedure was followed as in the handout for experiment one. DATA AND OBSERVATIONS: We obtained 2.009g unknown #1. We sublimed the NH 4 Cl before adding water to the mixture. When decanting the mixture there quite a few particles of sand remained in the water solution. Sand also remained on the beaker in which the sand had been decanted. Also when measuring the heated crucibles and watch glass the scale oscillated with an overall negative trend which we attributed to heat loss, as well as remnants of mixture spilled on the scale. CALCULATIONS AND RESULTS:
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Experiment 1 - Griselmarie Alemar Partner Amber Frommherz...

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