Lecture 3 - RNA Translation

Lecture 3 - RNA Translation - Lecture 3 Background Reading...

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1 RNA Translation Biology 1F25 for Biology Non-Majors Lecture 3 Background Reading Textbook: Chapters 3 and 21 and suggested pages on the following slides The People Who Prepared This Lecture Harry Peery Jeff Stuart (1) The cell is a factory Builds itself, and also makes bits for other cells Nucleus – manager’s office Ribosomes – assembly lines mRNA - foreman Endoplasmic reticulum - finishing touches Golgi apparatus – packaging Membrane – brick walls with lots of doors Mitochondria – furnace Food – fuel for furnace
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2 Nucleus (and some rough endoplasmic reticulum) We have seen how mRNA was transcribed. We now want to see how mRNA is translated. The nucleus: where the DNA and its managers are kept The messenger RNA leaves the nucleus through nuclear pores. What the nuclear pores look like under the electron microscope.
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3 1. Nuclear envelope. 2. Outer ring. 3. Spokes. 4. Basket. 5. Filaments. (Drawing is based on electron microscopy images) Direction messenger RNA goes from nucleus to cytoplasm A nuclear pore Nuclear pore complex in greater detail. Left, scanning electron micrographs of the nuclear pore showing the basket like structure. Illustrations from Lodish, et al., (2008), Molecular and Cell Biology, WH Freeman, New York. p. 570 mRNA Direction mRNA takes as it goes through the nuclear pore TDP-43 is a protein that shuttles mRNA through the nuclear pores • Binds to both DNA and RNA • It seems to function in assisting mRNA out of the nucleus through the nuclear pore. • Normally is found in large amounts only in the nucleus • Probably also shuttles the mRNA used to produce filaments in neurons. • (the ’43’ is its molecular weight in kilodaltons) What’s in a name like “TDP-43” • Acronyms (abbreviated names) such as TDP-43 are commonly used in science. • The first ones were formed over 3,000 yeas ago by anatomists. • Often, the original meaning of the acronym has been lost or forgotten. • For example, the name “coccyx” (your
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Lecture 3 - RNA Translation - Lecture 3 Background Reading...

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