Lecture 17 - Introduction to Cancer and Cancer Genetics

Lecture 17 - Introduction to Cancer and Cancer Genetics -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Introduction to Cancer and Cancer Genetics Biology 1F25 for Biology Non-Majors Lecture 17 Section II What is cancer and why does it occur? Background Reading Textbook, Chapters 18 and 19. The People Who Prepared This Lecture Harry Peery Alan Castle Cancer: Cells gone wrong
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Major questions to be addressed: 1. What is cancer? 2. How does cancer develop? 3. What is the genetic basis for cancer? 4. What is meant by the term “predisposition to cancer”? 5. Can cancer be prevented? Cancer: Effect on Society Cancer is the leading cause of potential years of life lost for both males and females in Canada
Background image of page 2
3 Cancer: Frequency
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 The incidence of most types of cancer and associated mortality increase dramatically with advancing age. Is a person more likely to develop cancer today than twenty years ago? Is a person more likely to develop cancer today than twenty years ago? No.
Background image of page 4
5 Is a person more likely to die from cancer today than twenty years ago? Is a person more likely to die from cancer today than twenty years ago? No. What are the trends for specific types of cancer?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Males Males The age standardized incidence of most types of cancer remained constant over the past twenty years. Exceptions: decrease in lung, stomach and bladder cancer; increase in prostate, melanoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The age standardized mortality rates of most types of cancer decreased over the past twenty years. Exceptions: slight increase in melanoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In order to understand cancer, we first need to explore genes and genetic disorders The Chromosome is a Unit of Genetic Material
Background image of page 6
7 How is a chromosome made? A few lectures ago, we talked about bases in DNA and its complement DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA) mRNA In the two strands of DNA, the bases are also complementary The complementary strands are coiled into a helix. Since one spiral is coiled around another spiral, the structure is called a double helix. The helix is wrapped around proteins called histones. And then coiled some more.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 And coiled some more so that in mitosis it looks like this. All cells divide
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/10/2008 for the course BIOL BIOL-1F25 taught by Professor Peery during the Spring '08 term at Brock University.

Page1 / 16

Lecture 17 - Introduction to Cancer and Cancer Genetics -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online