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Lecture 19a - Supplementary Information on X-linked Disorders and Disorders Due to Chromosome Numb

Lecture 19a - Supplementary Information on X-linked Disorders and Disorders Due to Chromosome Numb

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1 Lecture 19a Supplementary information on X-linked disorders and disorders due to chromosome numbers You are not responsible for this information. It will not be on the exam. Bone and calcium and the regulation of calcium Bone Cells Osteoblast – young “teenager” bone cell – has a “blast” laying down bone – very active Osteocyte – mature bone cell – sits there and does not do very much. Osteoclast – urban renewal bone cell – destroys bone so new bone can be formed. Stem cell – divides into either osteoblasts or osteoclasts Bone Structure Next Slide
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2 The Osteon Osteocyte in a lacuna Haversian canal Boundary of lamella The Osteocyte This is an electron micrograph of an osteocyte in its lacuna (Latin for little lake). Note the projections (called osteocytic processes) of the cell through the canaliculi (little canals in Latin). Osteocytes keep in touch will other osteocytes in an osteon. If they retract these processes, they die. Canaliculus Osteocytic process Lacuna Nucleus of the osteocyte The Canaliculi go to and from the Haversian Canal An osteocytic process in its canaliculi goes right to the Haversian canal. Capillary Capillary Dr. David T. Morgan The beautiful electron micrographs of bone in this lecture were all done by Dave Morgan, Professor of Histology, University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver All sane professors have a balanced life outside of the laboratory and classroom, and here Dave is seen with his falcon and dog in the mountains west of Boulder, Colorado. Below is a picture of the Flatirons (the Front Range of the Rockies) at Boulder. Photo and electron micrographs from visualhistology website
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