Lecture 32 - Predisposition to Cancer

Lecture 32 - Predisposition to Cancer - Lecture 32...

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1 Predisposition to Cancer Biology 1F25 for Biology Non-Majors Lecture 32 Background Reading Textbook, Chapter 19. The People Who Prepared This Lecture Harry Peery Alan Castle The basic questions 1. What is cancer? 2. How does cancer develop? 3. What is the genetic basis for cancer? 4. What is meant by the term “predisposition to cancer”? 5. Can cancer be prevented?
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How do we determine whether or not any characteristic has a genetic basis? First indication: Higher chance of occurrence of the characteristic in a family when compared to the whole population. Does this prove that the characteristic has a genetic basis? Breast cancer is not a single disease: (a) it can occur in different breast tissues (b) a person can develop cancer in one breast in her lifetime (unilateral disease) or in both breasts (bilateral disease) (c) cancerous cells from different patients can have different appearances (d) breast cancer can be associated with different cancers (e) onset can be early or late . Example of a pedigree for
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Lecture 32 - Predisposition to Cancer - Lecture 32...

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