Report on Stress in the work place

Report on Stress in the work place - Stress at Work Group...

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Stress at Work Group Exercise 14B Presented by Radu Drula Courtney Smith Amy Stassi Michelle Weber December 4, 2007
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Stress in the work place Aching muscles? Loss of appetite? Restless sleep and a complete sense of exhaustion? We often try to ignore these problems, often caused by stress, which can result in becoming more short-tempered and irritable. Job stress can be defined as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Job stress can lead to poor health and even injury. The concept of job stress is often confused with challenge, but these concepts are certainly not the same. Challenge energizes us psychologically and physically, and it motivates us to learn new skills and master our jobs. When a challenge is met, we feel relaxed and satisfied. Thus, challenge is an important ingredient for healthy and productive work. The importance of challenge in our work lives is probably what people are referring to when they say “a little bit of stress is good for you.” However, some challenges have turned into job demands that cannot be met, relaxation has turned to exhaustion, and a sense of satisfaction has turned into feelings of stress. In short, the stage is set for illness, injury, and job failure. Some specific causes of job stress include: Excessive workload, tedious or meaningless tasks, long hours and low pay, infrequent rest breaks, and unreasonable performance demands. Some examples of organizational practices that cause stress are: unclear responsibilities or expectations, conflicting job demands, multiple supervisors, lack of autonomy or participation in decision-making, inefficient communication patterns, or lack of family-friendly policies. Nearly everyone agrees that job stress results from the interaction of the worker and the conditions of work. Views differ, however, on the importance of worker characteristics versus working conditions as the primary cause of job stress. These differing viewpoints are important because they suggest different ways to prevent stress at work. Some argue that differences in individual characteristics such as personality and coping style are most important in predicting whether certain job conditions will result in stress. In other words, what is stressful for one person may not be a problem for someone else. This perspective leads to prevention strategies that focus on workers and ways to help them cope with demanding job conditions. Although the importance of individual differences cannot be ignored, scientific evidence suggests that certain working conditions are stressful to most people. By 1995, nearly one-half of the States allowed worker compensation claims for emotional disorders and disability due to stress on the job. However, courts are reluctant to uphold
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claims for what a “normal individual” would consider common working conditions or just hard work. Some Early Warning Signs of Job Stress Include:
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This note was uploaded on 06/10/2008 for the course MAN 3600 taught by Professor Whistler during the Spring '08 term at Florida College.

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Report on Stress in the work place - Stress at Work Group...

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