Alexander Hamilton - Emily Kern Professor Ivy Alexander Hamilton http\/www.pbs.org\/wgbh\/amex\/duel\/peopleevents\/pande06.html Alexander Hamilton was born

Alexander Hamilton - Emily Kern Professor Ivy Alexander...

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Emily Kern Professor Ivy Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton was born in the British Isles on January 11, 1757 and would be abandoned by his family because he was the result of adultery. He worked at the early age of 11 and went to King’s College in Columbia at 16. In 1774, he began a career in politics with his “A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress”, which defended the First Continental Congress. In 1776, Hamilton became a captain in the Continental Army and would later be in George Washington’s staff. He married Elizabeth Schuyler, but they were not able to have children. He became a lawyer in New York and first defended Loyalists. This lead to the repeal of the Trespass Act, which allowed Patriots to sue Loyalists for use and damage of property. In 1787, Alexander Hamilton went to the Philadelphia Convention. He believed America needed a stronger government and became a advocate of the Constitutions ratification. He helped write the Federalists newspaper that defended the Constitution and would convince New York to ratify it. Alexander Hamilton was chosen by George Washington to be the first secretary of Treasury. He saved the country with his use of War bonds, assumption of state debts, and a system for collecting taxes. He would later clash with Thomas Jefferson and both would resign. In 1797, it was revealed that Hamilton had an affair with Maria Reynold and linked him to manipulating federal securities with her husband. He proved innocence by publishing the love letters, which damaged his reputation. Despite this, George Washington promoted him as acting commander of the U.S Army in 1798. Aaron Burr, in 1800, published a confidential article by Hamilton, which helped the Republican Party. But later in 1804, Hamilton spoke against Burr, who was Vice President. Burr challenged him to a duel, and on July 11, 1804, Hamilton was shot, and would die the next day from his wounds.

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