Lecture 7 - Articulation and Phonology

Lecture 7 - Articulation and Phonology - Ar ticulation and...

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Unformatted text preview: Ar ticulation and Phonological Disor der s Chapter 10 Overview • Speech sounds – English alphabet – Definitions – Vowels – Consonants • Speech sound acquisition • Articulation and phonological errors • Types of speech disorders – Functional – Organic English Alphabet • English has 26 letters, but about 40 sounds e.g., t, h 2 letters, but 4 sounds » T ap = /t/ » H it = /h/ » Th ing = / θ / » Th is = /ð/ a 3 sounds English Alphabet • The same sound can be spelled many different ways – /s/ say, miss, psychology, lice, accent, scene, tsunami – /u/ to, clue, coo, few, soup, shoe, two, huge, fruit • The # of letters vs. # of sounds • Sam = 3 letters 3 sounds • Sham = 4 letters 3 sounds • Chew = 4 letters 2 sounds • Wash = 4 letters 3 sounds • Rough = 5 letters 3 sounds • Watch = 5 letters 3 sounds Definitions • Articulation – Shaping of speech sounds by lips, tongue, & other articulators • Phonology – The study of rules and patterns of speech sounds Definitions • Phoneme – Speech sound (/m/, /i/, “sh”) – Smallest unit of sound that can affect meaning e.g., m at vs. b at • Allophones – Variations of a phoneme – Variations do not affect meaning e.g., • ca p : /p h / aspirated (puff of air) • ca p : /p/ unreleased (unaspirated) Vowels • Always voiced • Open vocal tract - no constrictions • Sound changes based on tongue and lip position Vowels Tongue moves around to alter the shape of the oral cavity Velum is raised to close off nasal cavity Vocal folds vibrate to generate voicing Vowels • Make the /a/ (“ah”) sound: – Velum closed off (air through mouth) – Velum open (air through nose) • Nasal vowels are used in some dialects (and by some individuals in any dialect) – “Janice” on the TV show Friends (Chandler’s on- again/off-again girlfriend) Vowels Consonants • Produced by constricting the vocal tract • Classification – Place: location of the constriction – Voicing: presence or absence of vocal fold vibration – Manner: degree or type of constriction • Table 10.2 in text Consonants • Consonant Classification –...
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This note was uploaded on 06/10/2008 for the course HSLS 108 taught by Professor Mccarthy during the Spring '08 term at Ohio University- Athens.

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Lecture 7 - Articulation and Phonology - Ar ticulation and...

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