Lecture 16 - Audiology 1

Lecture 16 - Audiology 1 - Audiology, Fundamentals of...

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Unformatted text preview: Audiology, Fundamentals of Sound, Anatomy & Physiology of Hearing Mechanism Chapter 14 Overview • What is audiology? • Fundamentals of sound – Frequency, pitch, pure tone, complex tone, periodic, aperiodic, amplitude loudness, dB • Auditory A & P – Outer ear – Middle ear – Inner ear – Physiology of hearing What is Audiology? • The discipline involved in: – Prevention, identification, and evaluation of hearing disorders • Prevention: e.g., public awareness re: noise induced hearing loss – Selection of hearing aids – Habilitation/rehabilitation of hearing loss • Habilitation: For those born with a hearing loss • Rehabilitation: For those w/ acquired hearing loss • An audiologist: – Expert in hearing and hearing disorders – Audiologists work in: • private practice settings • Hospitals • rehabilitation centers • Schools – Classroom acoustics a big focus right now – Kids don’t have processing ability to screen out extraneous noise the way adults do • hearing aid companies • Industry – E.g., hearing conservation programs ( such as coal mines) Fundamentals of Sound • Sound – Vibrations traveling through a medium (such as air or water) that are audible – Sound is caused by Vibrations – Sound waves occur even if there is no one present to hear them – Frequency • Physical characteristic • Number of vibrations per second • Measured in Hertz (Hz.) : Cycles per second • E.g., Middle “C” on the piano = 256 Hz • ~500-4000 Hz = speech frequency range – Pitch • Perceptual characteristic • Perceptual correlate of frequency – That is, you can’t hear frequency, but you can hear pitch • When the frequency changes, we hear different pitches – Increase frequency Increase in pitch –...
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This note was uploaded on 06/10/2008 for the course HSLS 108 taught by Professor Mccarthy during the Spring '08 term at Ohio University- Athens.

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Lecture 16 - Audiology 1 - Audiology, Fundamentals of...

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