W1R - Why People Move

W1R Why People - Why People Move Exploring the March 2000 Current Population Survey Special Studies Why do people move Most social scientists agree

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U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Issued May 2001 P23-204 Why People Move: Exploring the March 2000 Current Population Survey Special Studies By Jason Schachter U S C E N S U S B U R E A U Helping You Make Informed Decisions Current Population Reports Demographic Programs March 1999 to March 2000 Why do people move? Most social scien- tists agree that there are a combination of economic and noneconomic reasons for moving that vary depending on the time period and the age of the movers. Previ- ous research shows that increases in age reduce the likelihood of moving (until re- tirement age) and that long-distance moves are most common among the highly educated. Generally, the distance of the move is related to whether the move is motivated by employment or housing rea- sons. Interregional moves are more likely to be job-related, while intraurban moves are more likely to be housing related. 1 Until recently there has been little national data on individual reasons for moving. Typically, researchers have viewed differ- ences in aggregate mobility rates and streams as a response to variations in place characteristics. Thus, macroeconomic de- terminants (e.g. place level characteristics) are often used to infer motivations for mov- ing, which is typically viewed as a microeconomic (individual level) phenom- enon. The addition of a question on main reason for moving to the 1998 Current Population Survey (CPS) reduces the need to make indirect inferences about individual decisions to move. In 1998, a reason for moving question was added to the March CPS. Reason-for- moving responses are collected from the householder and for all other people 1 year and older who moved during the past year. Those who moved with the householder are assigned the reason of the householder. The reason-for-moving question offers 17 response categories, ordered under four groupings: family, employment, housing, and other reasons. 2 Only one reason is en- tered for each mover, with responses to the “other” category recorded verbatim. Based primarily on data from the March 2000 CPS, this analysis focuses on movers within the United States between March 1999 and March 2000, though some data for the March 1998 and March 1999 CPS Movers are defined as those who were living in a different house or apartment 1 year prior to the March Current Population Survey. Movers were asked for the location of their previous residence. Movers can be categorized as to whether they were living in the same or different county, state, or region, or were movers from abroad. For the purposes of this re- port, moves across county bound- aries are defined as long-distance moves (intercounty migration), while moves within counties are defined as short-distance moves (also called residential mobility).
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2008 for the course SOC 221 taught by Professor Mogford during the Spring '08 term at Western Washington.

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W1R Why People - Why People Move Exploring the March 2000 Current Population Survey Special Studies Why do people move Most social scientists agree

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