Fundamentals Of Physics (6ºed)\chap01

Fundamentals Of Physics (6ºed)\chap01 - 58 − 58 − 58...

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13. None of the clocks advance by exactly 24 h in a 24-h period but this is not the most important criterion for judging their quality for measuring time intervals. What is important is that the clock advance by the same amount in each 24-h period. The clock reading can then easily be adjusted to give the correct interval. If the clock reading jumps around from one 24-h period to another, it cannot be corrected since it would impossible to tell what the correction should be. The following gives the corrections (in seconds) that must be applied to the reading on each clock for each 24-h period. The entries were determined by subtracting the clock reading at the end of the interval from the clock reading at the beginning. CLOCK Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. -Mon. -Tues. -Wed. -Thurs. -Fri. -Sat A 16 16 15 17 15 15 B 3 +5 10 +5 +6 7 C
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Unformatted text preview: 58 − 58 − 58 − 58 − 58 − 58 D +67 +67 +67 +67 +67 +67 E +70 +55 +2 +20 +10 +10 Clocks C and D are both good timekeepers in the sense that each is consistent in its daily drift (relative to WWF time); thus, C and D are easily made “perfect” with simple and predictable corrections. The correction for clock C is less than the correction for clock D, so we judge clock C to be the best and clock D to be the next best. The correction that must be applied to clock A is in the range from 15 s to 17s. For clock B it is the range from − 5 s to +10 s, for clock E it is in the range from − 70 s to − 2 s. After C and D, A has the smallest range of correction, B has the next smallest range, and E has the greatest range. From best the worst, the ranking of the clocks is C, D, A, B, E....
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2008 for the course PHY 013 taught by Professor Furlan during the Spring '08 term at UniFor.

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