{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

ch 5 - 5 THE INCOME STATEMENT AND STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5 THE INCOME STATEMENT AND STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS CHAPTER OBJECTIVES After careful study of this chapter, students will be able to:  1. Understand the concepts of income.  2. Explain the conceptual guidelines for reporting income.  3. Define the elements of an income statement.  4. Describe the major components of an income statement.  5. Compute income from continuing operations.  6. Report results from discontinued operations.  7. Identify extraordinary items.  8. Prepare a statement of retained earnings.  9. Report comprehensive income. 5-1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
10. Explain the statement of cash flows. 11. Classify cash flows as operating, investing, or financing. 5-2
Background image of page 2
SYNOPSIS Concepts of Income  1. The income statement summarizes the results of a company's operations for the period.  It often is  considered the most important financial statement for several reasons.  First, the income statement  enables absentee owners (stockholders) to evaluate the stewardship  of management over invested  capital.  Second, past income may be used to predict future earnings and net cash flows  which, in  turn, are useful in predicting future stock prices and current and future dividend payments.  Finally,  income information can also be used to predict the company's ability to generate cash from  operations to meet interest payments and operating obligations.  2. Under the capital maintenance  concept, income for a period is the amount that may be paid to  stockholders during that period while leaving the company as well off at the end of the period as it  was at the beginning.  In other words, income is the difference between the beginning and ending  capital (or net asset) balances after adjustment for investments and disinvestments during the  period.  Accountants and economists could probably agree on the measurement of total income for  the entire life of a company.  However, for shorter time periods income is subject to dispute,  because the values of a company's beginning and ending assets and liabilities may be measured  in a variety of ways.  3. The transactional approach  is currently used for income measurement.  Under this approach, a  company records its assets and liabilities at historical cost, and does not record any changes in  value unless a transaction, event, or circumstance has provided reliable evidence of the change.  The transactional approach uses the accrual  basis.  That is, the impact of any change is recorded  in the period in which it occurs, rather than the period in which related cash is paid or received by 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}