Figures Chapter 5 - OJ FIGURE | 5.1 The Model of Buyer...

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Unformatted text preview: OJ FIGURE | 5.1 The Model of Buyer Behavior The environment Buyer's black box Marketing stimuli Other Buyer's characteristics Buying attitudes and preferences Product Economic Buyer's decision process * Purchase behavior: what the buyer buys. Price Technological when, where, and how much Place Social Promotion Cultural Brand and company relationship behaVIor We can measure the whats. wheres. and _ whens of consumer buying behavior. But it's very diitcult to 'see' inside the consumer's head and tgure out the whys of buying behavior (that's why it's called the black box). Marketers spend a lot ottime and dollars trying to T‘gure out what makes customers tick. 9 FIGURE 1 5.2 Factors Influencing Consumer Behavior Psychological Groups and social networks Age and llfe- Many brands now target Cycle Stage Motivation speci‘Fc subcultures—such OCCUPatlon Perception as Hispanic American. Subculture _ Economic situation Learning Atrican American. and Famlly Li I _ Asian American I 35W e Bellefs and consumers—with marketing P:§?g::tge:?d atlltudes A :gfiflfiffij fa their Social class Roles and status Our buying decisions preferences. b are attected by an incredibly complex combination of external People 5 buying decisions reflect and contribute to their and internal inFuences. lifestyles—their whole pattern of acting and interacting in the world. For example, Pottery Barn sells more than just home Furnishings. it sells an upscale yet casual, Family— and fi‘iendatocused lifestyle. y FIGU RE I b.3 'he Major American Social Classes Upper Class Upper Uppers (1 percent): The social elite who live an inherited wealth. They give large sums to charity, own more than one home, and send their children to the iinest schools. Lower Uppers (2 percent): Americans who have earned high income or wealth through exceptional ability.They are active in social and civic atfairs and buy expensive homes, educations, and cars. Mlddle Glass Upper Middtes {12 percent): Protessionals, independent businesspersons, and corporate managers who possess neither famin status nor unusual wealth.They believe in education, are joiners and highly civic minded, and want the “better things in Hie." Middle Ctass (32 percent): Average-pay white- and blue-collar workers who live on “the better side of townf'They buy popular products to keep up with trends. Betler living means owning a nice home in a nice neighborhood with good schools. Education vnerica‘s social classes show dist'incr rand preterences. Social class is not etermined by a single factor but by a an“, ornbinat'ion 0F ali 0F these factors. Working Class Working Class (38 percent): Those who lead a “working-class lifestyle,” whatever their income, school background, or job. They depend heavily on relatives for economic and emotional support, advice on purchases, and assistance in times of trouble. Occupation Lower Class Upper Lowers (9 percent): The working poor. Although their living standard is just above poverty, they strive toward a higher class. However, they often lack education and are poorly paid for unskilled work. Lower Lowers (7 percent): Visibly poor, often pooriy educated unskilled laborers. They are often out of work, and some depend on public assistance. They tend to live a day-to-day existence. 'J I'IGUHI: | 2. f SWOT Analysis: Strengths (S), Weaknesses (W), Opportunities (0), Strengths Weaknesses and Threats m lntemal capabilities that Internal limitations that may Hang on To this on?! SWOT GfifliYS may help a company interfere with a company’s (PWWUHGEd “SWOT amt/SE) '5 0 '“tema' reach its objectives ability to achieve its 7 wldeir used tool for conducting a objectives 3“ situation analysis. You'll fnd yoursel using It a lot in the fixture, especlaii The 900' OfSWOT GMIYSIE' ,7 when analyzing business cases. Is +0 march 1115 campanys Opportunllles Threats strengths to uni-active External External factors that the Current and emerging opportunities In the company may be able to external factors that may environment. while eliminating exploit to its advantage challenge the company’s or overcoming ‘iiie weaknesses performance and minimizing the threats. Posltlve Neoatlve ...
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