America - Evgeny Buryakov seen here in a court sketch has...

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Evgeny Buryakov, seen here in a court sketch, has been accused of spying for Russia. (CNN)The FBI used techniques reminiscent of Cold-War spy tactics to eavesdrop on Russian intelligence agents in New York City: bugging binders full of "confidential" industry information, court documents revealed this week. The covert practice was revealed in filings for the trial of Evgeny Buryakov on Tuesday, who was arrested in January 2015. Prosecutors allege that Buryakov posed as an employee for a Russian Bank in New York City but was actually working for the Russian foreign intelligence agency, SVR. Spies: Swaps and sentences – What happens to spies when they're caught? Agents from other countries are usually traded, while American turncoats tend to get locked away. Here's look at some dossiers starting with the Cold War era. Jonathan Pollard. Jonathan Pollard is a divisive figure in U.S.-Israeli relations. The former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst was caught spying for Israel in 1985 and was sentenced in 1987 to life imprisonment. Previously, the United States and Israel discussed his possible release as part of efforts to save fragile Middle East peace negotiations, according to sources familiar with the talks. On July 28, 2015, Pollard's lawyer announced that the convicted spy had been granted parole and would be released on November 21 exactly 30 years after his arrest. Francis Gary Powers. During the late 1950s, the CIA flew high-altitude U-2 spy planes over the Soviet Union on a regular basis until one of them was shot down in 1960. Its pilot, Francis Gary Powers, was captured. After the United States denied any involvement, both Powers and the wreckage of his aircraft were put on display in Moscow. Tried and convicted of espionage, he was traded for convicted Soviet spy Rudolf Abel in 1962. Rudolf Chernyayev and Valdik Enger. Covert KGB officers Rudolf Chernyayev and Valdik Enger got ensnared in a 1977
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