Higher Cognitive Functions

Higher Cognitive Functions - Review Divided Attention...

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Review Divided Attention: paying attention to Selective Attention: Switching Attention: being able to switch your attention from one task to another, back and fourth Sustained attention: vigilance Episodic memory is most affected by aging Two views within information processing approach to explain declines in processing speed: neural network view (neurons die off, creating gaps so information needs to take detours), information loss view (losing information along the way) General slowing hypothesis Different games develop cognitive skills and slow down decline Higher Cognitive Functions - need basic cognitive functions in order to function Person-environment Interactions - in young adulthood the main type of person-environment interaction is schooling - for late adulthood, it is retirement - in middle adulthood it is focusing on career and taking care of children and parents The focus of cognitive development - Is formal training in young adults - For middle adults it tends to be job-related and focusing on developing specific cognitive skills which are designed to help you excel at your career - In late-adulthood, it is about the effects of physiological decline on your development Cognitive potential - Academic achievement in young adults - Career achievement in middle adults - Trying to minimize cognitive decline in late adults Trajectory of cognitive performance - Increasing cognitive performance/abilities - Late-adulthood are declines - In middle adulthood, some things are increasing and some are declining The definition of intelligence – there is not a proper one, however, (in lecture slides) Most agree that intelligence includes social knowledge, reasoning, a capacity to acquire knowledge, and problem-solving ability Measuring intelligence The old formula: IQ = (mental age/chronological age) x 100
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You are compared to your age group Wechsler intelligence scales (in slides) o These keep being updated based on norms, etc.
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