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AMERICAN CIVIL WAR - AMERICAN CIVIL WAR Causes There were...

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AMERICAN CIVIL WAR Causes There were many causes for the outbreak of the Civil War. Many people agree slavery was the main cause for the war. In addition, sectional differences led to conflicts. Northern and Southern states were developing different lifestyles and cultures. Differences in the economic life of the North and the South also contributed to the conflict. The North’s economy focused on finance and manufacturing, and the South specialized in crops and agricultural trade. Southern states also began to question the extent of the federal government’s power. Abolitionist Movement The Abolitionist Movement was active in Northern and Western states before the Civil War. Abolitionists wanted slaves to be freed. Some abolitionists favoured relocating then in Africa. Many, but not all, abolitionists believed African-American salves should have the same freedoms as their owners. Southern states opposed the abolition of slavery; it was a financial necessity and part of their social structure. The South’sagricultural trade depend on crops produced with slave labour. A Divided Nation The North’s population was three times that of the South. Most other countries recognized the Union as the government in America. However, Britain and France had friendly relations with the Confederacy and considered aiding the South. The North also was more affluent. The South had about nine million people, including about three million slaves. The average Southerner was not as wealthy as the average person living in the North. About 90 percent of American industry and railroads were in the North. Reliance on slave labor discouraged the creation of new jobs in the South. This discouraged immigration, and most immigrants settled in the North. The end of the civil war The Union victory in the Civil War in 1865 may have given some 4 million slaves their freedom, but the process of rebuilding the South during the Reconstruction (1865 1877) introduced a new set of significant challenges. Under the administration of President Andrew Johnson in 1865 and 1866, new southern state legislatures passed restrictive “black codes” to control the labour and behaviour of former slaves and other African Americans. Outrage in the North over theses codes eroded support for the approach known as Presidential Reconstruction and led to the triumph of the more radical wing of the Republican Party. During Radical Reconstruction, which began in 1867, newly enfranchised blacks gained a voice in government for the first time in American

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Civil War, American Civil War, President Andrew Johnson

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