Writing_2

Writing_2 - HISTORY 05010: WRITING ASSIGNMENT #2 The 1830's...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HISTORY 05010: WRITING ASSIGNMENT #2 The 1830's and 40's witnessed the creation of America's first industrial proletariat. Not only were the members of this first generation of industrial workers overwhelmingly female—the so-called "mill girls" who flocked to Lowell, Lawrence, and other New England textile towns—they were highly literate as well. Collectively, the mill girls produced a vast literary output—letters home, diaries, and a magazine, The Lowell Offering —that constitutes a rich and varied body of written documents. Thanks to such materials, historians have been permitted an uncommonly detailed glimpse into the human dimensions of early American industrialization. In interpreting this evidence, many historians have argued that the changes that early industrialization wrought in production also caused a profound shift in gender relations. According to such theories, as the home and the workplace became increasingly removed from one another, each sphere acquired distinct characteristics, which Americans often conceptualized in gendered terms. Barbara Welter, for example, asserts in her well-known article, "The Cult of True
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Writing_2 - HISTORY 05010: WRITING ASSIGNMENT #2 The 1830's...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online