ENG2131 Fantasy Final Exam - Jessica Creppin 7672146 Dr Rosemary Daniels ENG2131 A 13 December 2016 Take-Home Final Exam Fall Semester 2016 2 1 A

ENG2131 Fantasy Final Exam - Jessica Creppin 7672146 Dr...

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Jessica Creppin 7672146 Dr. Rosemary Daniels ENG2131 A 13 December 2016 Take-Home Final Exam Fall Semester 2016
1. A central theme of this course has been the use of the mythic significance of the journey as a way to explore the human condition within a fantasy novel. Choosing two of the novels studied in the course compare and/or contrast the ways that the authors address the significance of differing kinds of journey in their novels. Journey in a story is crucial to the development and change of a character. In a previous English class, the professor introduced to us an article written by Joseph Campbell called The Hero’s Journey. His book explained how each character must go through crucial steps in order to go through the change that is necessary in the book. A hero must have adventure thrust upon them. They will experience a “Call to Adventure” which they will usually begin by turning down, but inevitably end up going. The adventure, varying per story, brings them into a different world, introducing them to many challenges while also creating many new allies. The journey through this new world helps the character realize their inner potential and grow to become the hero he is meant to be. Sailing to Sarantium by Guy Gavriel Kay tells the story of Crispin’s physical journey from Varena to Sarantium while also focusing on his character development throughout his journey. Crispin is a short-tempered mosaicist who had lost his wife and two children to the plague. The steps of Crispin’s ‘hero’s journey’ begins when an Imperial messenger delivers a royal summons for Martinian, who Martinian pretends is Crispin. Martinian refuses to go to Sarantium because of his old age and tries to influence Crispin to go in his place. Crispin denies because he is comfortable where he is now and is still mourning the loss of his family, which has left him dead inside. This death inside of him is a loss of spirit, which is why this journey is so crucial for him to go on. Crispin 2
finally agrees to go to Sarantium when the Queen asks Crispin to deliver him an extremely secretive message to the Emperor. Crispin only tends to do things for people that he is emotionally connected to. The Queen’s youth and vulnerability moves Crispin to go to Sarantium and deliver the message for her, not for the summons that Martinian had passed off to him. While on the road to Sarantium he is introduced to Kasia, a young slave girl who is to be sacrificed on the day of the dead. Crispin decides he is going to save the young girl and that since “he felt no real desire for anything, not even life”(152) he was the perfect person for the job. Although the fact that Crispin does want to save Kasia’s life shows that he is starting to care. It is not until their escape that Crispin realizes this. While continuing on their journey, they encounter Ludan the forest god in the form of a bison. They follow Ludan deep into the forest, the underworld, where the truth comes out. Crispin remembers that he said he did not care for life anymore but now,

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