Seattle_Doha_Cancun

Seattle_Doha_Cancun - Page 1 of 16

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
C:\DOCUME~1\BM05.000\LOCALS~1\TEMP\Seattle_Doha_v5.doc "From Seattle and Doha to Cancun" 9/12/03 12:22 PM Page 1 of 16 Trade Politics, second edition Brian Hocking and Steven McGuire, eds. Routledge, forthcoming, 2003 Chapter 2 “From Seattle and Doha to Cancun: The trade agenda in the new Millennium” Bruce E. Moon Lehigh University Fifth Draft Abstract This chapter provides an overview of recent global trade negotiations by chronicling the rocky road they have followed since the creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995. The 1999 WTO conference dubbed “the battle of Seattle,” interrupted the march toward globalization by questioning the distribution of its costs and benefits and by raising doubts concerning the legitimacy of the WTO itself. Whether Seattle will prove to have been a decisive turning point is not yet clear. The outcome of 2001's WTO Ministerial in Doha, Qatar hinted that it represented more a temporary hiatus than a permanent change of direction. However, the stunning lack of progress in the run up to the ministerial scheduled for September 2003 in Cancun, Mexico suggests that without a more fundamental alteration of orientation the WTO risks a descent into illegitimacy and irrelevance. A detailed look at the negotiating positions of various nations and groups, each designed to achieve its own interests, reveals little cause for optimism that the deadlock can be easily broken. Global trade negotiations have followed a rocky road since the creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995. This chronicle will show that the tumult is at once a microcosm of the broader debate about globalization, a forum for alternative voices concerning the proper role of international institutions, and a struggle over the economic interests of various nations. The first stop was Seattle in 1999, where large and violent public protests contributed to the disastrous collapse of the first effort to construct an agenda for those negotiations. “The battle of Seattle” reflected nagging questions about the legitimacy of the WTO, which stem from anti- globalization perspectives in developed countries and charges of ideological and political bias coming from poor countries. The second stop, the ministerial meeting in 2001 in Doha, was designed to put the negotiations back on track, largely by ignoring the most fundamental philosophical questions, but this account will show that the effort served only to highlight the very different priorities among nations. The contested and confused outcome meant that achieving a focused negotiating agenda was largely deferred to the 2003 ministerial in Cancun,
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
C:\DOCUME~1\BM05.000\LOCALS~1\TEMP\Seattle_Doha_v5.doc "From Seattle and Doha to Cancun" 9/12/03 12:22 PM Page 2 of 16 where prospects do not appear much brighter for narrowing the gap in positions produced by the very different economic interests of nations. The debacle at Seattle
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

Seattle_Doha_Cancun - Page 1 of 16

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online