CoursePackMasterENG108001

CoursePackMasterENG108001 - ENG 108-001: Literature of the...

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Unformatted text preview: ENG 108-001: Literature of the Holocaust Spring 2008 Monroe Community College 2 ENG 108-001: Literature of the Holocaust Table of Contents Course Information 3-21 Course Information Sheet 3-9 Course Calendar 10-12 MLA Formatting 13-21 Written Response Assignments 22-32 Written Responses 22 #1: How a Perpetrator Is Born 23 #2: Hatching a Plan from Hell 24 #3: The Abnormality of Normal Ghetto Life 25 #4: The Living Dead 26 #5: How Is One to Tell a Tale 27 #6: A Sign of the Times 28 #7: And They All Lived (Un)Happily Ever After 29 #8: Ironic Incidents 30 #9: Fighting the Good Fight 31 #10: The Aftermath 32 Yom HaShoah Response Assignment 33 Paper #1 Assignment 34-35 Paper #2 Assignment 36-37 3 ENG 108: Literature of the Holocaust Spring 2008 Section #001: T/Th, 11am-12:20pm Rm 12-207 Instructor: Regina Fabbro Phone: 292-3464 Office: 5-541 Office Hours: T/Th, 9-11am E-mail: rfabbro@monroecc.edu Mailbox: English/Phil. Office (5-532) Web: http://web.monroecc.edu/rfabbro Course Description This course is a study of the Holocaust through a variety of different genres including poetry, novels, short stories, plays, memoirs, and children's literature, in order to gain a better understanding of the major ideas of this period. The course will take an historical view beginning in the 1930's and progress to the 1950's, exploring what was taking place in Europe politically, economically, and socially through the lens of a variety of writers. -- MCC Catalog & Student Handbook How does literature impact our understanding of the Holocaust? Is it ever actually possible to know this event? Can a memory of an event and a factual accounting of it contradict one another? What do our choices as audiences of Holocaust literature say about us? And how might literature help us to understand the individual choices that led to the Holocaust? In an attempt to respond to these questions and others, we will read, discuss, and write about a number of literary works from different genres (memoir, graphic novel, poetry, drama, legend, short story, and novel) and periods (from those written before the Holocaust to those written during the event and after). Through discussion, group work, and brief lectures, well investigate both traditional and more unconventional methods of approaching literature. Terminology common in literary analysis will be discussed and used and well consider the treatment of several themes present in Holocaust literature. Course Outcomes Successful completion of this course will reflect your ability to: Produce 1 paper (approximately 1000 words) and written assignments (totaling approximately 2500 words) that focus on 1) the use of literary devices such as symbolism, metaphor, and irony and the specific scholarly concerns related to different genres and writing styles, such as memoir, allegory, and fable, among others, 2) the ways in which literature highlights and comments on the individual choices that led to the Holocaust, and 3)...
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CoursePackMasterENG108001 - ENG 108-001: Literature of the...

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