PHIL 2 - A In Plato's Symposium Socrates starts out by...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A. In Plato’s Symposium , Socrates starts out by discussing the idea of Love with Agathon. A woman by the name of Diotima had once debated with Socrates that “Love was neither fair nor good” (Plato, 572) and had convinced him to take her stance. Socrates had argued that if this was the case, then Love must be evil and foul in which Diotima wisely replied that things did not have to be one way or its opposite. Love was neither a God nor a mortal but instead was a spirit that bonded all men together. Socrates tells Agathon how Love was born on Aphrodite’s birthday. Poverty had, in a way, tricked Resource into conceiving a child together and since Love was born on the goddess of love’s birthday, he had become Aphrodite’s “follower and attendant” (Plato, 574). Diotima also teaches Socrates that Love exists in order to achieve immortality. Everyone, including men, can become pregnant in the sense that men seek out women for pregnancy when they are ready to produce a child. This child and act of reproduction
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This essay was uploaded on 10/23/2007 for the course PHIL 262g taught by Professor Yaffe during the Fall '06 term at USC.

Page1 / 3

PHIL 2 - A In Plato's Symposium Socrates starts out by...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online