lecture 7 - The Nervous System The function of the nervous...

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The Nervous System • The function of the nervous system is communications, or the transmission of impulses. • It is involved with the co-ordination and control of all other body systems. • Anatomically, the nervous system is divided into the central nervous system (CNS), which consists of the brain and spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), which consists of all other nerves. • The CNS receives information from sensory nerves in the PNS, interprets and integrates it, and coordinates a response through PNS motor nerves. Cells of the nervous system are called neurons • Neurons are specialized cells that consist of the following three parts: – The dendrites, tree-like appendages which receive information; – The cell body, which contains the nucleus; – And the axon, a long process which takes information away from the cell body.
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• A myelin sheath (lipid) surrounds and insulates many neurons, like the plastic that surrounds copper wire. How do neurons transmit impulses? • Nervous impulses are called action potentials, and move down neurons as waves of electricity. • In every resting nerve cell, there exists a resting electric potential of about -65mV (the inside of the neuron
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This note was uploaded on 06/17/2008 for the course BIO 202 taught by Professor Dean during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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lecture 7 - The Nervous System The function of the nervous...

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