WestCiv3 - lack of a cohesive government of their lands led...

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Clarice Maia Western Civilization I Reading Response #3 I've found that one of the best ways to situate the times and places of historic events so that I can organize the information I take in in a comprehensive manner is to visualize a timeline that outlines the waves of predominant empires and the extent of their dominium in time and maybe even more importantly, in territory. Through following the series of rises and defeats of many empires in the Middle East, certain patterns can be found which might trace a connection between unsystematic expansion and eventual outside incursion. Although many other variables come into play, there seems to be a consistent repetition in the downfalls of Near East empires. I'll try to develop my hypothesis the best I can. The fall of the Egyptians created the opportunity for the Hebrews to expand their territories and claim Egyptian lands. However small, the early Hebrew kingdom seemed unified and empowered by their faith. However, the unity in the ‘Promised land” did not last long and the
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Unformatted text preview: lack of a cohesive government of their lands led to an inevitable downfall. The rise of the powerful Assyrian empire then led to the downfall of the Hebrew predominance and the eventual expansion of the Assyrian empire seemed to firmly establish its power. Despite the more advanced governmental organization of the Assyrian kingdoms, they still witnessed their downfall before the Mede and Persian attacks. Many great empires seem to have followed a similar fate, expanding their dominion over vast lands with increased military forces, only to fail in governing and protecting the conquered lands and ultimately being overcome by external attacks. It was only a matter of time before the Persians would make the same mistake by trying to conquer Greece! I'll see if this idea holds truth further in history as we continue into chapter 3. On a different note, I also want to take this opportunity to develop more on the evolution of Jewish religion....
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This note was uploaded on 06/18/2008 for the course HIST 332 taught by Professor Townsend during the Spring '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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