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Class_notes - Class Notes 9-25 ARTL 100 Folklore vs Literature-different versions always the same first and last line and everything in

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Class Notes 9-25 ARTL 100 Folklore vs. Literature -different versions - always the same first and last line and everything in between -variation - single author, 1 version, multiple copies -no author - folk- lore Folklore: - “artistic communication in small groups” – Ben Amos - “multiplicity and variation”- A. Dundes - “Unofficial discourse” Graffiti is folklore and mythology is a form of folklore, lords prayer is not -Folklore requires a performance and audience and it has to be a tradiation and unhofficial. Translation studies: depends on the perception of the culture that you are translating for. 1. Fluency: all concepts can be expressed and understood in English (no footnotes). Domestication: Safe Translation or diminuation which makes the foreign culture seem harmless. 2. Foreignization: tries to counter the fluency strategy by reminding the reader that what they are reading isnt English. 3. Brazilian Cannibalism: Taking a foreign culture and making the language a middleground, willingness to accept those concepts and make them your own. 4. Exoticization: Actually embellish the original stories to make them much more foreign than it was before. 5. Syncretism/ Hybridity: Active vs. passive= Preformer vs. audience Myths - related to mythology - common misusage of the term, often reffering to something that is false. - Has to do with the devine, spirit world, sacred truths, “time before time” - Men are usually number one and women are number 2 - Adam and eve: in nature, evil presence - Animals talking, play a large and powerful role in Natve American mythology. Legends - set in this world - might be true - invite discussions about beliefe Tales - not true, not set in this world (imaginary)
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Oral Forumulaic theory: parry-lord hypothesis Legendification: the process of a myth turning into a legend Memorate: an encounter that helps to prove of explain the legend. History (according to the western European culture) needs to be documented… even if it’s only from one person’s perspective. - Prejudice in American culture to conflate the two (History and history) and have a biased about wanting printed history as opposed to oral traditions Robert Lowie (famous NA historian): said there is no historical veracity in Native American folklore. Reading: When the mountain dwarfs danced - Both mythic and legendary appearances in this story. Historians don’t really use this work because there is no official documentation of this work. Historians tend to want documentation and a chronology.
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2007 for the course ARLT 100 taught by Professor Thompson during the Fall '07 term at USC.

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Class_notes - Class Notes 9-25 ARTL 100 Folklore vs Literature-different versions always the same first and last line and everything in

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