Interpreting__Prescriptions_and_Medication_Orders

Interpreting__Prescriptions_and_Medication_Orders -...

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Interpretation of Prescriptions and Medication Orders MSS 104 Medical Terminology 1
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Objectives Identify abbreviations used in writing prescriptions and medication orders Interpret abbreviations used in writing prescriptions and medication orders 2
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Prescriptions A prescription is a medication order written on a prescription blank to be filled at an outpatient pharmacy such as a community pharmacy May also be transmitted by phone, FAX, or electronically 3
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Prescriptions All prescriptions must contain: Prescriber’s name, address, phone number DEA number for controlled substances Patient name, address, date of birth Date the prescription was written Name of the medication Strength of the medication Dosage form Instructions to appear on the label (the “SIG”) Quantity to dispense Number of refills Prescriber’s signature 4
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Medication Orders A medication order is a written request from a prescriber on an order form for a patient in an inpatient facility. Medication orders can also be called in, faxed, or sent electronically Hospitals, Long Term Care Facility Medication orders must contain: Name of the patient Name of the drug Dose of the drug Dosage form Directions for administration Any additional instructions 5
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Interpreting Prescriber Directions Whether on an outpatient prescription, or an inpatient medication order, prescribers often use abbreviations to instruct the pharmacy on how to label the medication as it pertains to: Route of Administration Frequency of Administration Other directions This part of the prescription is often called the “SIG” and the codes used are “sig codes” 6
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Route of Administration Route of
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