Harn Diversity Project - Harn Diversity Project ARH 2000...

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Harn Diversity Project ARH 2000 Fall 2016 By AiVy Nguyen Beaded Coronet (orikogbofo)(Harn)c. 20 th century Abstract This paper explores ways the African art collection at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art contributes to diversity and cultural awareness in the University of Florida community in Gainesville. This art exhibit creates the opportunity for non-Africans to discover and delve into a culture they are not familiar with. The influence of art allows people from different cultures to lower the theoretical boundaries that separate their cultures. They are able to expand their knowledge on people with contrasting beliefs and traditions while seeing that there may be similarities there that they are unware of. Introduction Many college campuses are considerably diverse as there are usually students from all over the country and often a number of international students as well. The University of Florida is a great example of this, as the school consists of more than fifty thousand students. Even
though there are so many students, each student has a diverse background were raised differently from one another, but are able to come to together and if nothing else, they share the commonality of being a Florida gator. The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art’s purpose is to encourage students to actively engage with visual arts in learning about many different cultures around the world. The museum is located on campus and collaborates with the University of Florida to provide relevant art that reflects the diverse community. The collections and exhibitions foster creative thinking by presenting a range of regional to national issues bringing about cultural awareness. African Collection: Folklore The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art’s African Collection shares historical African culture and how important folklore and mythology were to the cultures on its continent. Art pieces were made in relation to deities and gods whom the people held in very high respect and whom they worshipped during rituals or daily practices. Yoruba People Many of the art pieces featured in this collection were Nigerian made, specifically from the culture of the Yoruba People. The Yoruba People are primarily from Nigeria in West Africa, but are spread across Benin and Togo as well. They are one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa and make up about twenty-one percent of Nigeria’s total population. They are actually a very diverse ethnic group within themselves and are bounded together by common tradition, language, and past. Their area in Africa was referred to as the Slave Coast. A substantial amount of their people were taken to the Americas during Slave trade.
In Yoruba traditional religion, there is one supreme being and hundreds of minor deities.

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