english-fresh-13-14 - School of English Freshman Modules...

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School of English Freshman Modules Courses Available to Visiting Students 2013/14 Freshman Courses The following courses of weekly lectures are for terms as specified. Each lecture course has a set of tutorials related to it in the term or terms it is given. These tutorials meet weekly in small groups. You will meet with your tutors at the first tutorial and they will set out the programme of classes. Michaelmas Term Freshman Courses Assessment for Michaelmas Term courses is by essay or exam as stated. Each course is worth 5 ECTS. Students who are here for Michaelmas Term only may take any course listed for Michaelmas term but must submit an essay on or before Friday 13 December 2013 and not sit an exam . Courses beginning with EN1 are Junior Freshman courses and require an essay of 1,500 - 2,000 words in length. Courses beginning with EN2 are Senior Freshman courses and require an essay of 2,500 - 3,000 words in length. Freshman Courses are taught by lectures and tutorials EN1020 Theories of Literature – Exam Dr Sam Slote Year-long students – Exam Michaelmas term only students – Essay (1,500 - 2,000 words) This course serves as an introduction to the more prominent varieties of literary theory and criticism practised since the late 19th century. Starting with the emergence of English literature as a field of study within the university, the course will cover Formalism, Structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Marxist criticism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Post-Colonial studies, and Popular Culture studies. EN1024 Early English Language – Exam Dr Helen Conrad O’Briain/Dr Stephen Graham Year-long students Exam. . *Entry for VS/Erasmus Students Conditional Michaelmas term only students Essay (1,500 - 2,000 words) This course focuses on the earliest attested stage of the English language, Old English, using a series of simple graded readings, in preparation for the course Beginnings of English Poetry. The course also offers a grounding in traditional grammar as applied to modern English. This course is taught through lectures 1
and twice-weekly classes. The twice-weekly classes start in week 2 of teaching term. Students who wish to sign up for this course must first meet with Dr Conrad O’Briain (Room 4026) in Fresher’s week in order to be vetted for suitability. Those deemed unsuitable will not be permitted to register. EN1015 Enlightenment – Essay (1,500 – 2,000 words) Dr Aileen Douglas/Dr David O’Shaughnessy ‘Enlightenment’ emphasises human reason and the power that comes from knowledge of the self and the world. In the eighteenth century, writers argued over the extent and implications of the human capacity to know, while the rapid growth of print culture seemed to indicate that human knowledge and the forms through which it could be expressed were expanding. This course considers Enlightenment in relation to religion, science, gender, popularization, the development of the city, and the rights of man (and woman). Lectures will concentrate on texts of different kinds, including prose fiction, poetry, the essay, and historical writing, c. 1700-1789. Writers studied on the course include Mary

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