Race Rel_Language and Definitions-3 - The Language of Race...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

The Language of Race, Racism, and PrivilegeEthnicity: a result of group formation processes leading from culture and descent. National origin, religion, culture.Define a few general concepts—sociological definitions of concepts often misused in popular discourse:Micro-level – AttitudinalPrejudice: An antipathy/dislike of a group based upon a faulty generalization. It may be felt or expressed. It may be directed toward a group as a whole, or toward an individual because s/he is a member of that group.Stereotype:An overgeneralization associated with a racial or ethnic category that goes beyond existing evidence. An important aspect of this concept is that it represents an overgeneralization and it is not supported by empirical evidence. This is distinguished from generalizations about groups made based upon empirical evidence. And, we must always understand that even when we have evidencethat enables us to discuss general patterns among racial groups, we cannot make the error of assuming an individual attribute based upon generalized data (thus we can say that statistically there are higher rates of poverty among African Americans than whites, but this does not mean that all African Americans are poor, nor that any African American that we run into in our daily lives will be poor).Self-fulfilling prophecy: Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes experiment:Jane Elliottis an American former schoolteacher, recognized most prominently as ananti-racismactivistandeducator. She is also known as afeministandLGBT activist.Elliott created the famous "blue-eyed/brown-eyed" exercise, first done with third-grade school children in the 1960s, which later became the basis for her career indiversity training. The exercise was conducted the day following Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. The purpose of the exercise was to try to teach her students the effects of being an oppressed group.On that first day of the exercise, she designated the blue-eyed children as the superior group. Elliott provided brown fabric collars and asked the blue-eyed students to wrap them around the necks of their brown-eyed peers as a method to easily identify the minority group. She gave the blue-eyed children extra privileges, such as second helpings at lunch, access to the new jungle gym, and five extra minutes at recess. The blue-eyed children sat in the front of the classroom, and the brown-eyed children were sent to sit in the back rows. The blue-eyed children were encouraged to
play only with other blue-eyed children and to ignore those with brown eyes. Elliott would not allow brown-eyed and blue-eyed children to drink from the same water fountain and often chastised the brown-eyed students when they did not follow the exercise's rules or made mistakes. She often exemplified the differences between the two groups by singling out students and would use negative aspects of brown-eyed children toemphasize a point.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture