Ware_11052007 - STEM CELL WRAPUP Review Part 1 of Dr Fuchs...

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STEM CELL WRAP UP Review Part 1 of Dr. Fuchs’ lecture, using study and viewing guide Review Part 2 of Dr. Fuchs’ lecture through the discussion about applications of stem cell research to burn therapy, using study and viewing guide TODAY : Goal is to highlight two important points from the last part of Dr. Fuchs’ lecture in Part 2, addressing two basic questions: Within the epidermis, where are stem cells located ? How are adult skin stem cells different from other cells in the epidermis, particularly in what genes are expressed ? We will examine an experimental approach used to obtain some answers to these questions.
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: Fuchs lecture part 2
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01/Integumentary/hair_follicle
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: Fuchs lecture part 2
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Skin Cell Highlights: About 20 cell types are present Main cell type is the keratinocyte Among the other cell types are: melanocytes (produce melanin that helps to protect skin from the effects of UV irradiation) Langerhans cells (which are involved in skin immune responses) Merke l cells (which detect mechanical pressure forces) Keratinocytes produce different variants of the protein keratin .
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Within the epidermis, where are stem cells located? How are skin stem cells different from other cells, particularly in what genes are expressed ?
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GAME PLAN 1) Use an expected characteristic of the stem cell population to distinguish them from other cells in the skin. Based on Dr. Fuchs’ studies, expect stem cells to be used sparingly and to divide infrequently . Keratinocytes with the potential to proliferate produce specific keratin proteins. 2) Based on these characteristics, engineer a “ TAG ” onto dividing keratinocytes. Note that one only want to “TAG” epidermal cells and NOT other types of cells. Also note that as cells divide, there should be a difference in the intensity of the “TAG” that is retained by cells. The “TAG” will be more intense in cells that divide infrequently, but will be diluted out in cells that divide repeatedly. Therefore, based on what one expects for stem cells, the “TAG” should be retained by stem cells, but lost over time in other cells (dilution effect) (seen in pulse chase experiments). Use a method (fluorescence microscopy) to visualize “tagged” cells within the tissue to determine where the stem cells are located. 3) Use a method (FACS) to separate different types of cells from one another based on the presence of the “tag” or not. Collect “tagged” cells into one pot and “untagged” cells into another pot.
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