Notes for Catching Hell in the City of Angels - Catching Hell in the City of Angels By Joao Vargas ,music, Vargas,acommunityactivi

Notes for Catching Hell in the City of Angels - Catching...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Catching Hell in the City of Angels By Joao Vargas Catching Hell’s six-chapter ethnography is based in a community—South Central Los  Angeles—where parenting, music, social interactions and community organizations serve as vehicles for social transformation. Vargas, a community activist prior to his re- search, moved into a South Central neigh- borhood in the early 1990s where he lived for two years and where gunplay is common and police helicopters routinely monitored his apartment complex. He befriends the res- idents whose lives prompt him to analyze the potential among this population to pursue social change.  The first three chapters cap- ture how black identity is affirmed through solidarity between poor mothers and com- munity workers, and through shared musical expression. The next two chapters explore black identity as it creates spaces in which jazz and blues artistry are affirmed as black- ness. In the last chapter, black identity oper- ates as a mechanics for self-help, for the kind of transformation that carries the potential for social change. Vargas presents fascinating portraits of four groups: women with drug problems, ac- tivists who fight against police brutality, for- mer gang members who try to maintain a truce between the Bloods and the Crips, and musicians who perform in local clubs. In each case he describes the perceptions and the definitions of “blackness” these people use to cope with oppression. The book’s most powerful instrument is the use of neighborhood maps to reflect the variety and complexity within the popula- tions of both blacks and Latinos throughout the areas of Watts, Crenshaw, West Athens, and South Park. These neighborhoods of converted garages and homes protected by iron bars rank among the top four most crowded areas in the U.S. Vargas notes: “So- cial fault lines in South Central LA reflect both contemporary social and economic dis-
parities and long-term struggles between and among blacks of different social groups, gen- ders, and sexualities, places of residence, ages, political outlooks, and relations to the state” (p. 15).

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture