soc 107 - Chris Collotta Sociology 107 Umass amherst Since...

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Chris Collotta Sociology 107 Umass amherst Since WWII America has become the biggest consumer of all products, natural resources and other commodities. Americans, young and old, are victims of hyper-consumerism, and I feel that the advertising industry is to blame for their lavish habits. During every TV show, on every billboard and in every radio program you can listen to and see hundreds of advertisements a day. In the book Affluenza, by John de Graaf, we learned that children are one of the largest as well as easiest targets of the advertising industry. In this paper I will argue that advertising to children leads to the hyper-consumerism as well as the world-wide spread of affluenza. In class we spoke of how children are a ticket into their parents wallets for large companies. These companies will advertise their products to children in a seductive and often misleading way. Some examples of misleading ads can be found on any television channel that has children viewers. For instance an ad for Barbie might read “learn how to become a princess with the new Cinderella Barbie,” or a GI Joe ad might go “become the greatest soldier by collecting the entire GI team!” Ads like these attract young children because they promise the kids that a positive change will come about from buying their product. Many adults today do not have a clue about what toys and video-games are popular. That is why many companies aim their ads at young children: kids can convince
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soc 107 - Chris Collotta Sociology 107 Umass amherst Since...

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