(3) Theories on Family Violence

(3) Theories on Family Violence - Theories on Family...

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Theories on Family Violence Chapter 3
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Chapter 3 Society Viewed at the Macro or Micro Level These terms look at the general approach not a particular theory Social interactions are not random acts – member of the family unit purposefully act to accomplish the goals of society Inferences are made from the individuals and applied to society at large – micro level Generally psychological or individualist theories Allows generalizations to be made about groups of ppl while understanding that the individual results may be different What happens in DV is considerable predictable yet the results vary based on intervening circumstances
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Classical School
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Chapter 3 Classical School Based on the idea that individuals choose to engage in crime Cesare Beccaria – father of classical criminology Ppl possess a will that is free and the ability to reason To control bx if would be necessary to specifically spell out what is criminal bc and the punishment that goes with it Ppl are hedonistic (pleasure seeking) The threat of humiliation, pain or disgrace would influence heir will Punishment must fit the crime, be swift and certain Bentham – moral calculus – determine extent of punishment necessary to deter crime Deterrence is the only acceptable reason for govt punishment This approach emphasizes control and punishment – legalistic Trend to criminalize DV is justified by the need to control family offenders Govt interference into private lives has been justified by overriding needs of society This was the dominant perspective in crime control for over 100 years Est criminal procedures that are still used today Contemporary classical thought includes that social influences are believed to have an effect on the ability of the individual to exercise free will
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Chapter 3 Rational Choice Theory Crime is a choice Offenders calculate the relative costs and benefits of bx and choose to commit domestic crimes Choices are not necessarily rational but draw on previously est beliefs about their opportunities to commit personal violence and the likely results of benefiting from their actions
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Chapter 3 Deterrence Theory Punishment must be swift and certain to deter crime Can be specific or general We don’t understand how effective deterrence is and why it works of fails Mandatory arrest policies – specific deterrence Reduction is greatest for those with a greater stake in conformity One way to measure deterrent effect of legislation is to examine the level of domestic crime to determine if the rate has gone down or risen
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Chapter 3 Critique of Classical School Clear statement of law and punishment All ppl are presumed to have the same opportunities to avoid crime Opponents claim that the law is unequally applied with bias toward minorities and the disadvantaged Does not look to explain why ppl commit crimes – seeks to control those who do
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This note was uploaded on 06/25/2008 for the course SOCI 313 taught by Professor Spencer during the Summer '05 term at Bridgewater State University.

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(3) Theories on Family Violence - Theories on Family...

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