Test 1 Study Guide Answers

Test 1 Study Guide Answers - Test 1 Study Guide Answers...

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Test 1 Study Guide Answers Introduction to Myth a. Know the Timetable of Myth as it appears in your book. I like to give you a list and ask you which of these events/people came first or last. -greeks (2100-1500) before romans (735 BC) -Jesus born: 4 BC -Caecer assassination: 44 BC b. Know Carl Jung’s theory of archetypes and Joseph Campbell’s idea of the hero as ego confronting the psyche. -Carl Jung: archetypes = paradigms of thought -primal ideas; basic modes within us -not learned/innate -Joseph Campbell: mythical stories spring from human psyche (self,soul) -reveal something about universal human experience -hero = ego confronting psyche c. What are epithets? Could you identify one? -epithet: descriptive adjective d. I usually ask several questions about the significance of anthropomorphism in Greek myth. Recall the Hebrew story of the golden calf. -Anthropomorphism: human shaped gods -golden calf: Hebrews worshipped a false god shaped like a calf -non Anthropomorphic = evil -Minotaur, Medusa, Centaurs: animal like creatures defeated by heroes e. What is the difference between traditional and artificial myth? -traditional: passed on for thousands of years
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-artificial: became a part of art -later fashioned into fixed stories f. Know the various skeptical objections raised in antiquity about Greco-Roman myths. -Xenophanes: said man only created gods to look just like them -greek like greek, African like african -Plato: greek gods are too immoral to be models -Hellinistic: Greek myths are allegory for something else -Euhemerus: Gods are just exaggerated stories about great humans who died -Lucretius: Myths come from human ignorance -reject Hellinistic g. Review the story of Paul and Barnabas at Lystra. -paul preaching gospel; sees man that was lame since birth; tells him to get up and walk; he does; people begin calling him Hermes and Barnabas Zeus Creation a. Read the Ovid creation story in Blackboard Learn. Pay attention to the various contributions made to human nature (that is, human ancestry was a mixed bag of good and bad, evil and idyllic behavior). What were the Four Ages? Please note the importance of violating boundaries for the decline of human nature. Does Ovid prefer philosophy or mythology as a means to explain human nature? b. Remember the four principles of the Greek world-view that I drew out of Hesiod’s creation story. For example, what is the significance of Aphrodite and the Furies both being born from the severed genitalia of Ouranos? -1.Division into opposites (but not polar opposites): -Chaos and Gaia: chaos is big open nothingness -can produce children
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-cant be complete nothingness if it produces something -gaia also has miniature chaos inside her (Mega Chasm) -intertwined -2.The power of metis: -intelligence will beat brute force -3.Knowledge alienates gods and men: -when man has too much knowledge, he needs gods less and less -4.The magical woman: c. What is Pandora’s box? Why is she called a magical woman?
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