Example methods and results

Example methods and results - Extracted from Pierpaoli...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Extracted from:  Pierpaoli, C.M. & Parmelee, P.A. (2016). Feelings of Usefulness to Others Predict Active Coping with Osteoarthritis Knee Pain. Journal of Aging & Health first published online April 22, 2016 doi: 10.1177/0898264316645549. Method Sample and Procedure Data were drawn from a larger, longitudinal study (1-R01–MH51800, Patricia A. Parmelee, P.I.) examining basic associations among pain, disability, and depression as well as factors germane to those linkages. The sample for current analyses were 199 adults with physician-confirmed knee OA. Participants were recruited variously through university and Veterans Affairs Medical Center rheumatology clinics, a general geriatric outpatient clinic, a previous psychoeducational study of OA, and public service announcements (PSAs) in local news media. Inclusion criteria required that participants were able to respond to questions in English, had no other life-threatening or severely disabling medical conditions, and provided signed consent for authorization to receive confirmation of their OA diagnosis. Persons for whom physician confirmation was unavailable were excluded from the study. Site determined route of initial contact. Respondents to PSAs called the research office directly. Clinic patients were sent introductory letters from attending physicians; as were previous research participants. A follow-up call from project personnel determined interest and eligibility for all participants. All assenting and screened individuals were mailed a packet of questionnaires and consent documents for independent completion and review. These were collected 1 to 2 weeks later during an in-person interview to gather additional data. Data for the current analysis were collected at second and third annual interviews. Thus, only those participants who were retained at the 2-year follow-up (Time 3; = 199) were included in current analyses. Measures All measures except personality were drawn from the third annual interview, as personality variables were collected at the second interview only. Demographic  and general health variables  include age, sex, race, marital status (categorically coded to represent married/cohabitating versus single,   widowed, and divorced/separated), functional disability, and subjective health. Each participant also indicated the number of people with whom she or he lived. Health was
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
measured objectively  by a count of health conditions endorsed on a 31-item checklist adapted from Lawton, Moss, Fulcomer, and Kleban (1982). Subjective  health  was represented by a three-item averaged composite: health overall (4-point scale, excellent  to poor ), now versus 5 years ago, and versus others the same age
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern