exam 3 review - Correlational research Correlational...

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Correlational research
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Correlational research Investigates relationship between 2+ variables Ex: is self esteem related to how shy people are?
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Correlational coefficients
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Correlational coefficient (pearson) Correlational coefficient : reflect the relationship among two+ naturally occurring variables in a lineal fashion Range from -1.0 to +1.0 Signs reflect whether relationship between variables is pos. or neg. Correlation of 0.0 reflects no relationship Ex: is age related to political conservitivism?
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Pearson Correlational coefficients
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Pearson Correlational coefficients Most commonly used measure of correlation (r)
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How does the correlation coefficients reflects the strength of a relationship between two variables?
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How does the correlation coefficients reflects the strength of a relationship between two variables? Higher the number, more strength Correlation of .78 just as strong as variables with correlation of -.78 When r=0.0 no relationship Indicates direction of relationship between two variables Either positive or negative Positive: direct, positive relationship between two variables As on variable increases, other also increases Negative: inverse, negative relationship between two variables As one variable increases, other decreases
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On a scatterplot (define), how might a positive, negative, or zero correlation be reflected by the pattern of the data?
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On a scatterplot (define) , how might a positive, negative, or zero correlation be reflected by the pattern of the data? Scatterplot: graph of participants’ scores on two variables Perfect correlation: straight line (1 to 1) Zero correlation: no linear relationship Could have curvilinear relationship Positive correlation: increase from left to right As one increases, so does other Negative correlation: decreasing from left to right As one decreases, other increases
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If the correlation between two variables is .00, what might you conclude?
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If the correlation between two variables is .00, what might you conclude? There is no relationship between the two variables
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A partial correlation is different than a correlation in what way?
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A partial correlation is different than a correlation in what way? Partial Correlation : correlation between two variable with the influence of one or more other variable statistically removed If the partial correlation between two variables (with the influence of the third variable removed) is significantly lower than the person correlation between the variables… Correlation is due partly to the third variable (or to variable associated to third variable)
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How would you describe a directional vs. non-directional hypothesis?
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How would you describe a directional vs. non-directional hypothesis?
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