IntroViruses

IntroViruses - A (Brief) Introduction to Lecture Outline...

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A (Brief) Introduction to
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Lecture Outline Definition Major Viral Lifecycles Viral Taxonomy and Classification Virus vs. Host Origination of Viruses Viruses in an Evolutionary Context Viruses and Human Health.
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What is a Vi r us ? Nucleic Acids (DNA or RNA) Encapsulated in Protein (= capsid ) Intracellular Parasite Sometimes surrounded by (more) proteins, lipids, and glycoproteins(= envelope ), the specifics of which will depend on the target
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Which of the following structures do viruses lack? A. RNA B. DNA C. PROTEINS D. ENVELOPE E. RIBOSOMES
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What is a Vi r us ? Size varies, but generally are small (comparatively) Smaller than bacteria ALIVE? Characteristics for Life Include: 1. Organization 2. Growth 3. Reproduction ? 4. Respond to Stimuli 5. Metabolic Processes
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What is a Vi r us ? ALIVE? Although a strong argument can be made for either side, viruses are generally considered to be non-living The main exclusion criteria are the facts that: Viruses cannot reproduce without a host (…at a molecular level) Viruses cannot respond to stimuli (…they don’t get cranky if you wake them up)
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What is a Vi r us ? (cont.)
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Repr oduct i on 1. Attachment 2. Penetration 3. Replication 4. Assembly 5. Release
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1. Attachment 1. Penetration Repr oduct i on Phage attaches to the cell surface Phage DNA enters bacterial cell
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3.
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This note was uploaded on 06/24/2008 for the course BIO 200 taught by Professor Herreid during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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IntroViruses - A (Brief) Introduction to Lecture Outline...

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